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Posts Tagged ‘other blogs’

The guys at Together for Adoption have just launched a new initiative called Live in the Story. Already there are some great resources on the website and that will build over time.

They asked me to voice the introductory video, I think, because reedy nasal whining is very now. So in this video I attempt the word “Mommy” and MLK’s “I have a dream” speech. Both were bold undertakings. I found “mommy” harder.

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I’ve just posted a little advertisement for our Passion for Life mission events held later in the month.

If you scroll down and click the link within that post:  “What’s On In Eastbourne” (as many times as you like!) I think it might help us ascend the search engine rankings.  Or something.  You’d think I’d be more web savvy wouldn’t you…

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Ben Meyers has en eye-opening quiz on theologians, sex and marriage.  Answers are in the comments.

I got 5/13.  What did you get?

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Hiram opens up Numbers brilliantly here.

Three poles lifted up – Numbers 13-14 (the pole carrying the firstfruits); Numbers 16-17 (Aaron’s budding staff) and Numbers 21 (the bronze serpent) – all types of Christ.

Read the whole thing, it’s wonderful, nourishing stuff.

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He’s also got a great post on Christ’s temptations here.

Which is good cos I’m preaching on them on Sunday.

Two crackers of sermons on Christ in the Wilderness are Mike Reeves‘ and Dan Cruvers‘.

Both of them take seriously the vicarious humanity of Christ.  He is in the wilderness not to show us how we can defeat Satan but to actually do it for us, in our place, as our Representative.  Check them out – very highly recommended!

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Peter Leithart on knowing as mutual indwelling.

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Ron Frost has written a cracker on some of the domesticated gods we Christians buy into:

…There is the fire insurance God. His greatest concern is to find as many policy holders as possible. His premiums vary, depending on the Christian community that sells his policies, but the payments are usually behavioral: mainly church attendance, a monthly tithe, and a midweek Christian book discussion or prayer group are the cash he requires. This is a pragmatic God, with pragmatic followers. For policy holders the real ambition is to avoid the fires of hell—a negative goal—rather than to know and enjoy God above all else. What God gets out of this arrangement isn’t clear but he seems to be a bit needy, looking for as large a following as possible. Lower premiums are always possible if an additional follower or two can be coaxed into the community that way.

Another much rarer version of God is the brainiac deity. His greatest capacity is intelligence so that his ideas and doctrines are great, complex puzzles. He invites chess champions, debaters, and logicians to compose and compare doctrinal statements about him. He is altogether different to the fire insurance version of God in that he is more interested in compelling ideas than in numbers of followers. His audiences are small but impressive, even if most of what they do is talk and write. Access to this God comes through Christian versions of the Mensa Society—churches, parachurch groups, and theological centers that elevate intellect over practice; a knowledge about God over a love for God and people.

Still another small version of God is the self-absorbed deity. He can think only of himself and wants everyone else to think only of him. The biggest fear for this God is what philosophers call “contingency”—that he is not fully in charge of everything but in some manner has a real involvement with his creation. If, for instance, he actually loves his creatures in a way that causes him to respond to them, he has somehow lost his mojo and is less than truly God. Instead he wants glory at any cost. Access to this God is virtually impossible because we are products of his will and live downstream from his first decrees and plans—a bit like dominoes that are now being tipped over by other dominoes, all started before the creation. He looks on with some sort of pleasure because everything is under his glorious control and control is his greatest ambition.

One additional, and final, version of a miniscule God is what we might call a stubborn Genie. He has a bag of tricks and powers to tease us—offering promises to heal us, to make us wealthy, to make us wise, to make us more powerful—but we first have to learn how to rub him right. What kind of rub is needed? At a minimum he looks for effort from his followers, real effort! Disciplines, devotions, tasks, duties, and best-efforts are needed. Accountability is the name of his game: the harder we work, the more likely it is that we can finally coax a benefit or two out of him. Some seem to get more out him than others, so he is not a very fair God, but ours is not to question him but to keep rubbing the jar of his being and to hope for the best…

Read the whole thing here.

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How sweet the sound.

66 minutes of the marvellous Menon on grace.  He plunges us to the depths then takes us to the heights.  Balm for the soul, as Will would say.

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