Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2012

Here’s a video released today by the British Humanist Association:

Below is the transcript with some comments from me:

.

An Introduction to Humanism

Rumy Hasan: It’s important to realise that one can live a fulfilling life without religion – where the focus is on human beings.

Many religions do in fact put the focus very firmly on human beings.  So how is “religion” being used by you and in this video?

.

AC Grayling: Humanism of course is not a religion.  It’s something which bases itself on a common-sensical view of the world. It’s an open-eyed view.  It takes seriously the facts about human beings and their experiences and tries to do the best on that basis.

From the descriptions following, humanism sounds very much like a religion.  It doesn’t sound like Christianity, but, sheesh, get a load of the moralising below.

It’s a good and right concern to want to be open-eyed, truth-seekers.  But there are some underlying assumptions here.  There’s an assumption that we can un-blind ourselves from our ignorance (through clear thinking?), that we know where our blind spots lie and can get perspective (notice how Grayling claims the commonsensical high-ground – he and the humanist fraternity are the ones who see).  There’s also an assumption about what kind of truth lies out there.  If the truth consists purely in facts to be discovered within the world by empirical studies then go for your life.  But you’ve pre-judged what kind of truth you can discover by pre-judging what kind of truth you believe already exists.

.

Polly Toynbee: A humanist sees the world as infinitely precious and quite extraordinary and almost miraculous.

Of course you do.  We are all worshippers who are awed by something.  If you aren’t awed by God, of course you’re awed by the world.

.

Tim Minchin: I think humanism is important because having a non-superstitious world-view allows you to go about your own business, making ethical choices based on a general desire to do the most possible good.

Having gotten rid of God, the humanist can now get on with the important business of doing good.  Again, this is not Christianity (which rather swaps “our goodness” for God), but it is distinctly religious in flavour.

There’s an excellent comment on the video from a free-thinker, Ontologistics: “As Nietzsche showed, Humanism is part of the Christian legacy. The word “good” is bandied about in this video without explanation or sanction, because it cannot be sanctioned. A freethinker will in fact adopt a Nihilist view, as this does not require belief in some supernatural, metaphysical “good”.  I.e. Humanism exchanges “God” for “good”, both of which are delusions. In this sense, it comes close to being a religion.”

.

Philip Pullman: I view the world as a place where I am extremely lucky to have been born and to have a consciousness because there are so many wonderful things to be conscious of.

Well you’re either absurdly lucky or there’s consciousness behind the cosmos.  A consciousness that arises from a mindless cosmos is quite a turn of luck indeed.

.

Zoe Margolis: We can be decent human beings and love and care and support each other and not expect a fantasy to fulfil our hopes and our dreams when we can actually live them in this lifetime.

Well I suppose rich westerners, if they’re talented and lucky enough, can live a few, very limited dreams.  But this comment seems to be a plea for dreaming smaller.

.

Isn’t it sad to think there is no after-life?

Andrew Copson:   Some people worry that a view of death as being the total and final end of life can be depressing.  They think it would be a more comforting thought that life went on.  But I think, and many other humanists think, that, rather than robbing life of its meaning, giving a finality to the story of your life actually imbues it with greater meaning.

Or, put it this way: Either we are taken seriously as a creature of eternal significance in the eyes of One who gives everything meaning, or we are a rational animal soon to expire and become compost.

.

Richard Dawkins:  If there’s something frightening about death, it’s the idea of eternity. Something about everything just going on forever and ever and ever. That’s a frightening thought.  And it’s just as frightening if you’re there as if you’re not.

If there’s something frightening about death.”?  If?  There’s a disturbing lack of reality to this approach to death.

.

Rumy Hasan: It just means that we have this life and we make the most of it.  If anything that’s a positive.  So we don’t say “Ah well, you know if we muck it up in this life, we have an afterlife.”  The onus is on us to lead better lives in this life.

Spoken like a true religionist.

.

How can humanists live ethical lives without religion?

Philip Pullman: The morality question is another one where people think, “Well we’ve got to have religion or we’ll all be immoral.”  That’s a very shallow and hasty way of thinking it seems to me.  There are all sorts of guides to morality.

No doubt!  Some good and some bad wouldn’t you say?  And who’s to arbitrate?  Really, who?

.

A.C. Grayling: People often think that you can’t have morals unless there is a god to enforce them somehow.  Look at classical antiquity, nearly 1000 years before Christianity became the official outlook of Europe, you have people who base their morality on reason.

Sure.  They base morality on an approach to reason.  But I doubt that Grayling adopts, wholesale, their morality or their account of reason.

.

Philip Pullman: There are enormous tracts, ranges, mountain ranges of meaning that our available to us without our needing to go to the Bible for them.

…and the Bible encourages us to explore them

.

Tim Minchin: I guess humanism is the beginning of a life of trying to live well and be good. And the thought that, you know, some mistranslated off-translated doctrine to tell you that that’s a good way to live is not just surprising but slightly abhorrent to me.  If you can have something that’s slightly abhorrent…

Again, Minchin reveals his deeply religious outlook – “trying to live well and be good.”  If any Christians are flirting with atheism because you can’t stand the moralism of your church – take a long hard look at humanism.  The only escape from moralism is the gospel!

And it’s not so much that Christians need a divine command to know what’s good.  That’s not our position.  Far more we say, “‘good’ depends on an understanding of reality shot through with the glory of Christ.”  “Good” corresponds to “God” in a profoundly personal way.  The good life is love of God and love of neighbour and it goes with the grain of a whole universe charged with His beauty.  Nothing abhorrent here.

.

Rumy Hasan: The humanist views the world in a rational manner.  It’s wondrous, it’s astonishing, awe inspiring, yes at times fearsome.  But a humanist says “well let’s try and understand the world”

Yes, let’s try and understand the world.  And in a rational manner.  But rationalism will shrink your view, not expand it.

.

Why might a humanist hold science in particularly high regard?

Andrew Copson: If you believe that we live in a universe which is a natural phenomenon which behaves according to certain discoverable natural laws and norms then of course the only way of finding out true facts about reality is through the scientific endeavour.

Wow.

First notice the premise: “If you believe…”  This is an inescapable fact of all enquiries – we’re all involved in faith seeking understanding.  But it’s nice to see Copson admitting it.

Second, these “discoverable natural laws and norms” – do they ever make you think?  Especially since they correspond to that consciousness we all love?  You seem to take these as a given.  Shouldn’t you be more curious about the ways of this world, wondering at “laws and norms” as part of this “natural phenomenon”?

Thirdly – and most outrageously – “the only way of finding out true facts”?  The only way??  For a start, this sentence has not been the outcome of the scientific method – it’s the result of certain beliefs.  So what the heck??  This amounts to something like: True facts are entirely the domain of the scientific endeavour (except for these self-justifying assertions that prop it up, in which case bad philosophy will do the trick nicely).

Fourthly, we see here a humanist side-lining the humanities.  Humanism de-humanizes.

.

A.C. Grayling: Humanists hold science in very high regard because science is the careful open-minded approach to trying to understand the world and human beings in it.  It’s a method of critical enquiry which is always ready to change its mind when better facts come along.

Good.  And in its own limited way it works well.  But science is set up as a naturalistic endeavour to study naturalistic phenomena.  Let’s discover all the facts we can in this way.  But let’s never think we’ve discovered the totality of reality via these methods (there’s also things like goodness, truth, beauty, love).  And if you want to pronounce on God, you’ll have to study Him via a method suited to His own self-revelation – i.e. you’ll have to listen to His Word.  If you won’t do that, I question how ready to change your mind you really are.

.

Polly Toynbee: It is a method of communication from one generation to another building on layers of knowledge and layers of knowledge on a really solid foundation.

What solid foundation is that?  Or should I say Whose solid foundation is that?  The firm ground on which the scientific endeavour stands relies on the intelligibility of nature.  The self-consistency of these laws and norms.  Their consistency throughout creation.  Their correspondence with our own minds.  Humanists are glad for these  foundations, but humanism doesn’t give them to us.

.

Richard Dawkins: Science is not only the way to go if you want to discover the truth about something, science is also wonderful, science actually exposes how wonderful the universe is and what a wonderful privilege it is that every one of us has the opportunity to understand the universe in which we live: where we came from, why we exist and where we’re going.  It’s just a wonderful, thrilling experience to immerse yourself in modern science. It’s a poetic experience.  Science is the poetry of reality

We begin with self-refuting nonsense about science being the way to discover truth (science didn’t tell him this!).  We end with the flourish: “science is the poetry of reality.”  Garbage.  Science is the appreciation of a poetry that’s already there.  That’s a hugely important distinction.  Because in the space of one sentence Dawkins has claimed science as the arbiter of truth and beauty.  Stunning!

But let’s get some perspective.  There’s truth that’s out there to be discovered.  There’s beauty that’s out there to be appreciated.  And science has role in uncovering it.  But the biggest question remains – and it remains beyond the scope of scientific endeavour – what on earth is truth and beauty doing out there?

.

What is the humanist view on human nature?

Andrew Copson: One of the natural consequences of humanism, of the idea that the human race is one species, of the idea that every individual member of that species is a bearer of the dignity that humanity gives us, is a general spirit of inclusiveness and that’s always characterised humanist thinking.

So the human race is one species (among 15 000 other species of mammals).  And apparently this confers a certain unspecified dignity on us.  In fact, humanity itself confers on each one of us this undefined dignity….  How does that work then?  This seems to amount to the claim that we are humans and not puffins.  And every human is a human and not a puffin.  And this is our basis for equality and inclusivism.  To be honest, I can think of firmer foundations.

.

Zoe Margolis: Unlike many religions which are unfortunately about repressing sexuality and having very anti-female and homophobic perspectives, humanism offers an alternative which is actually inclusive.

Without the gospel, all inclusivism works according to a certain ethic.  Some are in, some are out.  You’re not preaching a new inclusivism, you’re just preaching a new ethic.  Jesus came to bring true inclusivism – we’re invited to His table as sinners (outsiders!) and, through an acknowledgement that we’re all law-breakers, we’re brought into true community.

.

A.C. Grayling: Humanists begin to think about the good and flourishing life on the basis of their best understanding of how things are for human beings. But that does not mean that it’s got a particular line, a particular doctrine, that everyone has to fall in with.  In fact it demands of people that they think for themselves.

I dunno A.C., some of your friends here seem to be pushing some quite particular lines.  And let’s face it, you all have a very firm line on the nature of humanity, the kind of truth you are seeking and the way you discover and verify it.

.

Polly Toynbee: We have power in our hands to make our life and our society and our world better. We don’t stand to ask, there’s nobody else, no good getting on knees begging for someone else to do something, it’s just up to us.

 Yep.  Sounds like religion to me.  And a religion for the strong, the rich and the brave.

But if you’re not up to the BHA’s religious regime, I’ve got good news for you.  There’s a way to be a true humanist.  At Christmas we sing the line “Pleased as man with man to dwell, Jesus our Immanuel.”  Eternally our God has pledged Himself to man.  Forevermore our Lord has become Man – the truly inclusive Man – the man for all humanity.   And He’s for you.

Some just focus on humanity, some just focus on God-myths and after-lifes – in both cases you’ll lose a true vision for humanity.  But in the God-Man you’ll find true humanity.  He will liberate you from the self-justifying burden of being good and He’ll send you out into the world to rejoice in the truth and beauty that reflects His character.  There is a poetry to this world, and He’s the Poet.

.

Read Full Post »

A round based on Luke 1:78-79.

Best on full screen with headphones.  And do join it.  That’s the point…

.

Read Full Post »

Further Twit-Bits

Some recent Tweets from me.
Subscribe here.

We must be saved from our “wisdom” just as we must be saved from our “righteousness.”

Sin is hard and hardening work. Christ’s yoke is easy and His burden is light.

Hard to imagine Jesus responding to the question ‘How are you?’ with ‘Busy.’

There’s no faith in God without faith in Christ.

Our judgements of Music are like our judgements of Jesus- they constitute our *own* judgement. The Onion says it best

Jesus encamps around you (Ps 34:7). Before anything gets to you today, it has to go through Him. #EnjoyYourDay

It’s just as “finished” today as it was 2000 years ago. #EnjoyYourDay

If you’re a Christian you are “in Christ”. And you can’t get closer than “in”. #EnjoyYourDay

The gospel is not a process, it’s a declaration.

Sometimes satire says it best. @TheOnion God Admits Humans Not Most Impressive Creation  // The god of this age agrees!

All those wonderful things “we do for God”… how many of them are basically this?

There’s nothing uniquely gospel-driven about “gratitude 4 salvation. ” It’s precisely the motivation 4 living the law. Ex20:1-2

Soon your eyes will behold the King in His beauty, they will see a land that stretches afar. Isaiah 33:17 #EnjoyYourDay

In Christ you are not only blameless in God’s sight (Col 1:22), you are unblameable (KJV). #EnjoyYourDay

To say God is Creator is 1st to say He’s a Source to be received from. Too often He’s only spoken of as a Force to be reckoned with.

Creator means He *gives* life. Sounds obvious but needs saying.

‘As you believe God to be, so he is for you’ (Luther)

God does not dish out grace with a teaspoon. Your Father is a Fountain of life. #EnjoyYourDay

Belief in distinct roles and asymmetry can be Athanasian or Arian. Discernment needed. #Complementarianism #Egalitarianism

Once saved, always being saved. 2 Cor 1:10

Aim at ‘radical truth’ and you’ll get ‘balance’ thrown in (eventually). Aim at ‘balance’ and you’ll get neither balance nor truth.

Nehemiah 9 proves there’s nothing NEW covenant about Spirit-led, grace-motivated obedience…

…The newness of the New Covenant is Christ upholding our side…

…”You will be my people” says God. “Here I am, I’ve come to do your will” says Christ. And the covenant is fulfilled.

‘Free will’ claims to be the language of love. Isn’t love far more expressed by “falling for”/ “swept off my feet”/ “can’t help myself”?

Christ lives in you. #EnjoyYourDay

“Outside of Christ, I am only a sinner, but in Christ, I am saved. Outside of Christ, I am empty; in Christ, I am full…
…Outside of Christ, I am weak; in Christ, I am strong. Outside of Christ, I cannot; in Christ, I am more than able…
…Outside of Christ, I have been defeated; in Christ, I am already victorious. How meaningful are the words, “in Christ.” Watchman Nee

“Let me tell you, You have died! You are done with! You are ruled out! The self you loathe is on the Cross of Christ.” Watchman Nee

“Both the child & the cynic walk thru the valley of the shadow. The cynic focuses on the darkness; the child focuses on the Shepherd” Paul Miller

Ben Meyer’s one sentence summary of Church Dogmatics…
“God speaks a free and loving “Yes” to Jesus Christ; the event of this “Yes” is God’s trinitarian life & its corresponding echo is a creative…
…& redemptive “Yes” to humanity, so that God’s relationship to humanity is an echo & an analogy of God’s relationship to Jesus Christ.”

You are not God’s project, you are God’s child. #EnjoyYourDay

.

Read Full Post »


Audio of Talk to Youth

Powerpoint

Notes of talk…

Born in a shed… ruling the world…  How do you account for Jesus?

In the beginning… Christ was there.  John 1:1-3

God and His Son Christ decided to set a man – ADAM – as king over the world.

But the Eternal King was promised  to be born – Genesis 3:15

Offspring – Abraham… David

David – Made King, Crushes Oppressor

Solomon – Psalm 72

This King sounds a bit like Solomon – v8, 10

This King sounds much bigger than Solomon – v11, 5, 4, 6, 17

JUST (v1-3) and GENTLE (v4, 12-14)

Romans 10:9 – Who do you say Jesus is?

.

Read Full Post »

Audio for a 6 minute talk given at a BBQ today

.

For the next two weeks billions of people will roar advice to the world’s greatest athletes.

Helpful tips like, “Run faster, swim harder, he’s gaining on you, and Not like that!!”

Why do we do it? Because we are involved – they are our Champions, they are competing for us.

For me the biggest moment of connection was the 2000 Games, 4 x 100m swimming relay.

The American, Gary Hall Jr said the USA would  “smash Australia like guitars.”  But our champions did it for us. And after smashing the world record, they played air guitars to the Americans!  The roof nearly came off!

We feel an immense connection to our champions – they do it for us and we celebrate.

That’s how Christians feel about Jesus.  John 1:14

We don’t do life right.  We’re like the couch potato, full of bluster but no follow-through.

But lives the life we should live. As our Champion.  Then dies death we should die

Cross = Jesus representing us.  Taking on our much and enduring what it deserves

He rose up to defeat our biggest enemy – Death.  And He did it as Champion.

Enjoy the Olympics.  Enjoy the victories of others.  Don’t miss the ultimate Champion.  You don’t want to represent yourself before God. Allow Jesus and share in His victory.

Read Full Post »

The USA had never lost the 4 x 100m swimming relay.  Ever.  Gold medal, every Olympics.  And in 2000 they had Gary Hall Jr swimming the final leg – the “extroverted” 50m gold medalist who predicted the USA would “smash” the Australians “like guitars.”

Here’s how the Australians responded in front of their home supporters.  (USA is in lane 4, Australia in lane 5 (i.e. nearer the camera).

That’s the power of home advantage.  Over to you, Team GB!

What are your favourite Olympics moments?

.

 

 

Read Full Post »

This happened two years ago.  Revealing!

Finally!  JW’s knocked on my door this morning.  First time ever.  An older guy and a younger Polish woman.

So I threw some Genesis 19:24 shapes their way. “To which Jehovah are you witnessing, the LORD out of the heavens or the LORD on the earth?”

The woman seemed quite interested.  The man said “Trinity?  Rubbish.  Paul refutes the trinity in 1 Corinthians 11:3.”  So we went to 1 Corinthians 11:3

But I want you to understand that the head of every man is Christ, the head of a wife is her husband, and the head of Christ is God.

“How does this refute the trinity?” I ask.

“Well,” he explains, “God is the head over Christ.  Which means Christ is less than God.”

I say “So the Father is the head of Christ the way I’m the head of my wife?”

“That’s right”

“Let me ask you, Is my wife less of a human being than me?”

“Yes” said the man.  “N..” said the woman and then changed it to a faltering yes.

I check I’ve heard them right.  “So my wife is less of a human being than me?”

“Well,” reasons the man, “you make the decisions.  You’re in charge.”

“Hmmm (I hum non-commitally).  And so I’m a greater being than my wife?”

“That’s right” said the man.  The woman frowns.

I turn to her and say “You realise you’re in a cult don’t you.”

The man grabs her by the arm and they start to make their escape.

“Keep reading the bible and keep thinking about marriage,” I call to her as they move down the street.  “You know women are equal to men… AND JESUS IS EQUAL TO GOD!”

Don’t think they’ll be back any time soon.

But it goes to show that Arians are misogynists whatever the PC gloss.  And of course misogynists are Arians, whatever the Christian gloss.

.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »